Hideaki Anno Cinema @annocinema

Reverse-engineering filmmaking by dissecting Hideaki Anno’s works (Evangelion, Shin Godzilla, Kare Kano) Personal account: @chesterlaw
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Hideaki Anno Cinema @annocinema Media

Moving on to the next pillow sequence in Kare Kano Episode 8, we have a domestic scene in the Miyazawa household.

Recreating this sequence compared to the previous was much easier because its main driving force is music. As a result, the sound design doesn't need to be very complex at all, with the music doing the heavy lifting and bridging the shots together for us.

Looking at the shot flow we start off with two mystery hooks, one closeup showing a “sany” boombox playing music, and the other showing the activity of vacuuming.

We then cut to a wide establishing shot of the living room which explains the situation: someone is cleaning the living room while listening to music. It's interesting to see this underlying driving force of the hook and reveal even in a scene that pretty much has no story. While at first glance the scene is just a random sequence of images, in the reality the order and shot sizes are very deliberate.

After the wide we cut to cleaned dishes and a washing machine, cementing the theme of cleaning, before cutting to the final shot of the vacuum cord being retracted.

This second-to-last shot of the washing machine is easily overlooked but worth noticing.

See, a problem one has in conveying a task such as vacuuming through film is that vacuuming takes a while and one doesn't necessarily want to show the beginning to the end of such a mundane activity. One only wants to convey that it happened.

As such, one needs a time skip. We've seen Anno accomplish this before with

Moving on to the next pillow sequence in Kare Kano Episode 8, we have a domestic scene in the Miyazawa household. Recreating this sequence compared to the previous was much easier because its main driving force is music. As a result, the sound design doesn't need to be very complex at all, with the music doing the heavy lifting and bridging the shots together for us. Looking at the shot flow we start off with two mystery hooks, one closeup showing a “sany” boombox playing music, and the other showing the activity of vacuuming. We then cut to a wide establishing shot of the living room which explains the situation: someone is cleaning the living room while listening to music. It's interesting to see this underlying driving force of the hook and reveal even in a scene that pretty much has no story. While at first glance the scene is just a random sequence of images, in the reality the order and shot sizes are very deliberate. After the wide we cut to cleaned dishes and a washing machine, cementing the theme of cleaning, before cutting to the final shot of the vacuum cord being retracted. This second-to-last shot of the washing machine is easily overlooked but worth noticing. See, a problem one has in conveying a task such as vacuuming through film is that vacuuming takes a while and one doesn't necessarily want to show the beginning to the end of such a mundane activity. One only wants to convey that it happened. As such, one needs a time skip. We've seen Anno accomplish this before with "Parts Omitted" title cards but it's an overt choice. Another method is the cutaway, cutting away temporarily to another activity, and that's what the washing machine shot here is. The music is continuous and the sound of the washing machine drone is so similar to the vacuum's drone the transition is smoothed out and the audience scarcely realizes a time skip has occurred. Finally, I wanted to point out that although there's only one wide shot in this extended sequence, (a wide shot that doesn't even show the entire room to boot!) it's sufficient in giving us context of the space and we don't feel claustrophobic because of that singular shot. Editor: @watashi_sama

612 likes - 612 comments
I've been reverse-engineering the pillow sequences in Anno’s work, particularly Kare Kano. Pillow sequences show scenery of the setting and have no clear story purpose except for world building and establishing the atmosphere. At first glance, it seemed like one could just stitch together interesting looking shots with a consistent audio track for continuity and call it a day, but such was not the case.

Without the usual narrative undercurrent that drives a scene, what is essentially a slideshow with continuous sound quickly bores the viewer, as they're unsure why they're even watching the movie.

The answer here is in the sound design. Layering on and off new elements every few shots maintains interest and steps in for the missing driving narrative force.

See here my executed version based on this theory and the original version from Kare Kano episode 8.

I've been reverse-engineering the pillow sequences in Anno’s work, particularly Kare Kano. Pillow sequences show scenery of the setting and have no clear story purpose except for world building and establishing the atmosphere. At first glance, it seemed like one could just stitch together interesting looking shots with a consistent audio track for continuity and call it a day, but such was not the case. Without the usual narrative undercurrent that drives a scene, what is essentially a slideshow with continuous sound quickly bores the viewer, as they're unsure why they're even watching the movie. The answer here is in the sound design. Layering on and off new elements every few shots maintains interest and steps in for the missing driving narrative force. See here my executed version based on this theory and the original version from Kare Kano episode 8.

717 likes - 717 comments
In NGE14, the series' recap episode, SEELE is reviewing the incident with the 6th Angel while we see the navy fail to defeat the Angel.

It may seem to naive eyes that these shots are somewhat randomly chosen and cut together, but in reality even this ostensibly simple scene bears the undercurrent of a mini three-act structure.

In the first shot we have our exposition. We see the navy fire torpedoes at an off-screen target, presumably the 6th Angel.

The second shot confirms this suspicion and takes its place as the story of this scene showing that the navy is useless against the Angel. The torpedoes impact, albeit to no effect.

The final shot then serves its purpose as the final act of resolution in this scene. We see the Angel destroy a battleship, driving home the idea that the navy is powerless against this threat.

None of this is supposed to register with us as the audience. When we watch this scene we're only supposed to see that torpedoes are being launched, have no effect, and a battleship is destroyed. However what is driving us to continually watch until the next shot is the underlying three-act structure. We subconsciously crave the story after we've received the exposition, and long for the final climax that came at the end of this scene.

Also interesting to note is that every shot here is very wide. That the mini three-act structure can be told without using any close-ups at all and still retain a level of drama is an interesting takeaway.

Editing credit: @watashi_sama

In NGE14, the series' recap episode, SEELE is reviewing the incident with the 6th Angel while we see the navy fail to defeat the Angel. It may seem to naive eyes that these shots are somewhat randomly chosen and cut together, but in reality even this ostensibly simple scene bears the undercurrent of a mini three-act structure. In the first shot we have our exposition. We see the navy fire torpedoes at an off-screen target, presumably the 6th Angel. The second shot confirms this suspicion and takes its place as the story of this scene showing that the navy is useless against the Angel. The torpedoes impact, albeit to no effect. The final shot then serves its purpose as the final act of resolution in this scene. We see the Angel destroy a battleship, driving home the idea that the navy is powerless against this threat. None of this is supposed to register with us as the audience. When we watch this scene we're only supposed to see that torpedoes are being launched, have no effect, and a battleship is destroyed. However what is driving us to continually watch until the next shot is the underlying three-act structure. We subconsciously crave the story after we've received the exposition, and long for the final climax that came at the end of this scene. Also interesting to note is that every shot here is very wide. That the mini three-act structure can be told without using any close-ups at all and still retain a level of drama is an interesting takeaway. Editing credit: @watashi_sama

833 likes - 833 comments
From NGE14, Makoto notifies Misato that Shinji has woken up after his freak accident with Eva-00 and doesn't remember anything. For the first time we are encountering a scene where an establishing shot of the space isn't offered at all.  Perhaps the reasoning is that since we're in NGE14, we're far enough along in the show that we should be familiar with Nerv HQ and one isn't needed. However it's still strange and striking due to such an absence. The only way we understand this is Nerv HQ is through the familiarity with the ambient sound as well as the equipment present such as the chair, background, and the technical-looking phone.

We start off with an extreme close up on an action - Makoto putting down the phone. This action grabs our attention and thrusts us into the new scene while also being the mystery shot to the subsequent reveal shot.

We then cut to a shot of Makoto speaking to someone off-screen. We are revealed to who put down the phone, and where we are. His lines in this scene tell the entire story and serve as the scene's second act.

Finally, we cut via eyeline match to the person Makoto was speaking to this entire time, Misato who delivers the punchline. A cold

From NGE14, Makoto notifies Misato that Shinji has woken up after his freak accident with Eva-00 and doesn't remember anything. For the first time we are encountering a scene where an establishing shot of the space isn't offered at all. Perhaps the reasoning is that since we're in NGE14, we're far enough along in the show that we should be familiar with Nerv HQ and one isn't needed. However it's still strange and striking due to such an absence. The only way we understand this is Nerv HQ is through the familiarity with the ambient sound as well as the equipment present such as the chair, background, and the technical-looking phone. We start off with an extreme close up on an action - Makoto putting down the phone. This action grabs our attention and thrusts us into the new scene while also being the mystery shot to the subsequent reveal shot. We then cut to a shot of Makoto speaking to someone off-screen. We are revealed to who put down the phone, and where we are. His lines in this scene tell the entire story and serve as the scene's second act. Finally, we cut via eyeline match to the person Makoto was speaking to this entire time, Misato who delivers the punchline. A cold "I see." Again, Anno hard cuts this line off to create impact. It's interesting to look at the last two shots in this scene and notice that even though we had no expository shot of Makoto and Misato's spatial relationship, we nevertheless understand that the characters are looking at and talking to each other. Moreover, all our shots are super tight - either close-ups or extreme close-ups. The reason we still understand their spatial relationship is due to the use of the eyeline match, a cinematic technique where in one shot we see a character looking at something off-screen and then the next shot shows us what they were looking at. We connect in our minds that the character in the former shot was looking at the character in the latter shot. To pack on even more, we can even look at the last two shots as a “reverse” eyeline match, wherein we understand that Makoto was being looked at by Misato the entire time as well. Editing credit: @watashi_sama

713 likes - 713 comments
I love this scene for technical reasons.

We start off in this scene from NGE20 with a comfortable medium shot of Misato as she grieves for Shinji's apparent death. When suddenly there is a sound in front of her, and she looks up.

We then cut via eyeline match to a very wide shot (VWS) showing us a naked Shinji who has returned from Eva-01. Eyeline matches are where in one shot we see a character looking at something off-screen, and then the next shot shows us what they were looking at. Usually this entails cutting to a shot from the character's POV but Anno doesn't do that here and I absolutely love it.

By going for a VWS that shows both Misato and Shinji, Anno is able to show how Misato reacts, he gets an opportunity to exposit the larger spatial context, and this wide shot can more clearly convey the action taking place which is in this case Shinji's return.

Finally, we cut to a close-up of Shinji, and Misato gasping his name in surprise confirming that this is indeed Shinji and that he's going to be okay - the resolution to the overall scene.

Editing credit: @watashi_sama

I love this scene for technical reasons. We start off in this scene from NGE20 with a comfortable medium shot of Misato as she grieves for Shinji's apparent death. When suddenly there is a sound in front of her, and she looks up. We then cut via eyeline match to a very wide shot (VWS) showing us a naked Shinji who has returned from Eva-01. Eyeline matches are where in one shot we see a character looking at something off-screen, and then the next shot shows us what they were looking at. Usually this entails cutting to a shot from the character's POV but Anno doesn't do that here and I absolutely love it. By going for a VWS that shows both Misato and Shinji, Anno is able to show how Misato reacts, he gets an opportunity to exposit the larger spatial context, and this wide shot can more clearly convey the action taking place which is in this case Shinji's return. Finally, we cut to a close-up of Shinji, and Misato gasping his name in surprise confirming that this is indeed Shinji and that he's going to be okay - the resolution to the overall scene. Editing credit: @watashi_sama

894 likes - 894 comments
Today we look at a short scene from the legendary NGE24. Shinji has just killed the final messenger Kaworu in the iconic still-frame scene, and Gendo and Rei watch as Eva-01 is washed down. This scene begins the resolution to the entire episode and tells us that Nerv has wrapped up Kaworu's threat.

We start off with a close-up of Eva-01's bloodied hand. Cutting from the previous scene where Kaworu had just been beheaded we as the audience already have context as to why the hand is bloodied.

We then cut to the second shot giving larger context to the scale of this wash down and see two small figures looking up at the Eva unit. A way to think of the whole close-up to very wide shot cutting, is to think of it as gradual information supply. Instead of starting us off with a potentially informationally overwhelming very wide shot, with all the details of small characters, space, and location to absorb, we simply start with a hand being washed. Only after we gain that information are we ready to learn more.

Finally, in the resolution shot we are given a closer look at the two who are watching the event - Gendo and Rei. The two are rather stoic, both here and throughout the series. They look on without words objectively looking at the cleansing of Eva-01. This contrasts heavily with the highly emotional previous scene of Kaworu's demise. Shinji had just gone through something extremely tough yet these two act as if it's merely been yet another day at Nerv, fending off the threat of the Angels.

Editing credit: @watashi_sama

Today we look at a short scene from the legendary NGE24. Shinji has just killed the final messenger Kaworu in the iconic still-frame scene, and Gendo and Rei watch as Eva-01 is washed down. This scene begins the resolution to the entire episode and tells us that Nerv has wrapped up Kaworu's threat. We start off with a close-up of Eva-01's bloodied hand. Cutting from the previous scene where Kaworu had just been beheaded we as the audience already have context as to why the hand is bloodied. We then cut to the second shot giving larger context to the scale of this wash down and see two small figures looking up at the Eva unit. A way to think of the whole close-up to very wide shot cutting, is to think of it as gradual information supply. Instead of starting us off with a potentially informationally overwhelming very wide shot, with all the details of small characters, space, and location to absorb, we simply start with a hand being washed. Only after we gain that information are we ready to learn more. Finally, in the resolution shot we are given a closer look at the two who are watching the event - Gendo and Rei. The two are rather stoic, both here and throughout the series. They look on without words objectively looking at the cleansing of Eva-01. This contrasts heavily with the highly emotional previous scene of Kaworu's demise. Shinji had just gone through something extremely tough yet these two act as if it's merely been yet another day at Nerv, fending off the threat of the Angels. Editing credit: @watashi_sama

891 likes - 891 comments
Today's shot flow from NGE20 is a bit different. We still have exposition front-loaded, followed by the story, but it's done in a more novel and less straight-forward fashion.

Cutting from the last scene we are first presented with a title card of

Today's shot flow from NGE20 is a bit different. We still have exposition front-loaded, followed by the story, but it's done in a more novel and less straight-forward fashion. Cutting from the last scene we are first presented with a title card of "The Thirty-Third Day," signifying that time has passed. It's interesting to take note of this as a method to show the passage of time as opposed to the traditional fade to black which I find clumsy, in that it requires an extra method as opposed to simply cutting to another shot. We then cut to a close-up of the interior of Misato's car showing us that it's night time and she's driving. Ritsuko then speaks telling us she is in the car with Misato. This shot is the mystery shot to the overall reveal sequence, as well as the hook to the next shot. The final shot is then the reveal shot to the reveal sequence and shows us that Misato and Ritsuko are in the car. This shot is disproportionately the longest at 40 seconds out of 44 and holds the bulk of the story, including the rather human yet awkward interaction between Ritsuko and Misato at the end. Anno captures that moment of rejection between close friends well. Whereas in most of the shot flows we've looked at so far have reserved the final shot for the punchline, the punchline here is simply the last line in the already long shot. Ritsuko's understanding "I see," makes us wonder what she has comprehended, propelling us into the next scene that answers that question. Editing credit: @watashi_sama

649 likes - 649 comments
After a freak accident when Nerv tries to synchronize Shinji with Eva-00 in NGE14, Asuka is back in her bedroom reflecting on the overall situation. This scene is another mystery, reveal+story, punchline shot flow.

To start us off is a close-up (CU) of the ceiling to exposit the location.

We then are given a wide-shot of Asuka taken from the ceiling, giving the spatial context. Her lines of inner monologue begin telling the story.

In the third shot, a CU on Asuka, she continues her inner monologue expanding on the story, before breaking into actual voiced lines of speech and delivering the punchline to this scene. I love how Anno emphasizes this punchline by having it stand out as the only line that is actually spoken out loud, contrasted to the inner monologue prior. It wasn't the first, nor will it be the last time Anno uses this technique.

The majority of the shots I've showcased so far in Anno’s work have shown his consistent use of static shots. In the scenes I've analyzed they are static and most don't even use a zoom or pan. I think there's too much of an obsession these days over camera movement through gimbals and dollys and not enough of an emphasis on composition and juxtaposition through editing. Anno on the other hand, creates powerful scenes through nothing but static shots.

Editing credit: @watashi_sama

After a freak accident when Nerv tries to synchronize Shinji with Eva-00 in NGE14, Asuka is back in her bedroom reflecting on the overall situation. This scene is another mystery, reveal+story, punchline shot flow. To start us off is a close-up (CU) of the ceiling to exposit the location. We then are given a wide-shot of Asuka taken from the ceiling, giving the spatial context. Her lines of inner monologue begin telling the story. In the third shot, a CU on Asuka, she continues her inner monologue expanding on the story, before breaking into actual voiced lines of speech and delivering the punchline to this scene. I love how Anno emphasizes this punchline by having it stand out as the only line that is actually spoken out loud, contrasted to the inner monologue prior. It wasn't the first, nor will it be the last time Anno uses this technique. The majority of the shots I've showcased so far in Anno’s work have shown his consistent use of static shots. In the scenes I've analyzed they are static and most don't even use a zoom or pan. I think there's too much of an obsession these days over camera movement through gimbals and dollys and not enough of an emphasis on composition and juxtaposition through editing. Anno on the other hand, creates powerful scenes through nothing but static shots. Editing credit: @watashi_sama

744 likes - 744 comments
A hook-story-punchline shot flow is the subject of today's post from NGE20. This shot flow was also used in the scene where Misato drops Ritsuko off, the scene when Eva-01 throws the prog-knife down to Eva-02, and the scene when SEELE has a meeting about the awakening of Eva-01.

The first shot here is the hook. A mysterious close-up (CU) that obscures our full understanding of the situation and by doing so piques our interest. Notice that Misato doesn't speak here, increasing the mystery and pushing the story to the second shot.

Following up in the second shot is the reveal shot and the establishing shot of the space and location. This shot is the longest in the scene, and so has the opportunity to also tell the story of the scene - Misato grieving over Shinji's apparent death and wanting him to return from the dead.

In the final shot we have the Anno-ism of harshly ending a scene with an impactful punchline, complemented in terms of editing with Anno cutting off the end of Misato’s impactful line for greater effect. When this happens, we as the audience are curious as to what happens in that location after the line is delivered, but Anno then takes us away to the next scene at the next location. This creates a driving force that compels us to keep watching.

Editing credit: @watashi_sama

A hook-story-punchline shot flow is the subject of today's post from NGE20. This shot flow was also used in the scene where Misato drops Ritsuko off, the scene when Eva-01 throws the prog-knife down to Eva-02, and the scene when SEELE has a meeting about the awakening of Eva-01. The first shot here is the hook. A mysterious close-up (CU) that obscures our full understanding of the situation and by doing so piques our interest. Notice that Misato doesn't speak here, increasing the mystery and pushing the story to the second shot. Following up in the second shot is the reveal shot and the establishing shot of the space and location. This shot is the longest in the scene, and so has the opportunity to also tell the story of the scene - Misato grieving over Shinji's apparent death and wanting him to return from the dead. In the final shot we have the Anno-ism of harshly ending a scene with an impactful punchline, complemented in terms of editing with Anno cutting off the end of Misato’s impactful line for greater effect. When this happens, we as the audience are curious as to what happens in that location after the line is delivered, but Anno then takes us away to the next scene at the next location. This creates a driving force that compels us to keep watching. Editing credit: @watashi_sama

890 likes - 890 comments
In this scene from NGE23, we show how the exposition-problem-resolution shot flow can be more dependent on dialogue than visuals.

In the first shot of this scene while we do get a visual understanding of Gendo's office space, more important is the content of what Gendo is saying. He's setting up the context of the situation through speech.

The second shot introduces the main issue by having Fuyutsuki voice his thoughts on what would happen if Kiel found out about Rei. Just like in a three-act story, the second act escalates the problems, and this one does so with dialogue from Fuyutsuki.

Finally with the third shot fulfilling its role as the third act of resolution, the problem is solved. Gendo explains verbally that he has given SEELE something else; there is nothing for them to worry about.

I've also talked about how Anno will end one scene by having a character talk about something in particular, and the next scene will be that exact something. That's what this final shot does. After Gendo is done talking we transition to the next scene to see what he has presented to SEELE - a bare naked Ritsuko.

Editing: @watashi_sama

In this scene from NGE23, we show how the exposition-problem-resolution shot flow can be more dependent on dialogue than visuals. In the first shot of this scene while we do get a visual understanding of Gendo's office space, more important is the content of what Gendo is saying. He's setting up the context of the situation through speech. The second shot introduces the main issue by having Fuyutsuki voice his thoughts on what would happen if Kiel found out about Rei. Just like in a three-act story, the second act escalates the problems, and this one does so with dialogue from Fuyutsuki. Finally with the third shot fulfilling its role as the third act of resolution, the problem is solved. Gendo explains verbally that he has given SEELE something else; there is nothing for them to worry about. I've also talked about how Anno will end one scene by having a character talk about something in particular, and the next scene will be that exact something. That's what this final shot does. After Gendo is done talking we transition to the next scene to see what he has presented to SEELE - a bare naked Ritsuko. Editing: @watashi_sama

685 likes - 685 comments
At first glance, this may seem to be yet another classic exposition-story-punchline shot flow from NGE10, but from this scene of Kaji exchanging espionage information in a cable car we find Anno breaking a basic filmmaking rule for effect.

First we're shown an establishing shot of the location and hear the woman talking. Then we cut to a wide shot (WS) of the two showing us their faces unclearly through the glass which communicates that they're not meant to be noticed. We as the audience know that they're communicating because the audio is heard as if we are inside, but not from the outside without the audio.

The final shot here of Kaji in a close-up delivers the punchline about Nerv, which transitions us to the next scene back at Nerv.

However, what's really interesting about this final shot is that it breaks the holy 180˚ rule of filmmaking which is, if there is an interaction axis, an invisible line, between two characters like in the second shot between the woman and Kaji, the camera cannot cross to the other side.

However, you'll notice that the third shot does exactly that. In order to get the angle that it has, it needs to be looking at Kaji from the other side of the axis. We've crossed the line and broke filmmaking's sacred 180˚ rule.

This couldn't be a mistake in execution since the storyboards dictate this breaking of the rule, and they were personally drawn by Anno who knows the 180˚ rule well, as shown by a previous post.

What I surmise as the intention of this rule break is that it conveys a sense of doubt in us that these two were interacting in the first place. It asserts that they were merely fellow passengers on the cable car, as if this final shot visually denies, as the two would, that they were talking to each other at all.

Also, I've started a Patreon campaign to put more time into AnnoCinema! Check the link in my bio to check out my reward tiers and exciting goals!

Editing credit: @watashi_sama

At first glance, this may seem to be yet another classic exposition-story-punchline shot flow from NGE10, but from this scene of Kaji exchanging espionage information in a cable car we find Anno breaking a basic filmmaking rule for effect. First we're shown an establishing shot of the location and hear the woman talking. Then we cut to a wide shot (WS) of the two showing us their faces unclearly through the glass which communicates that they're not meant to be noticed. We as the audience know that they're communicating because the audio is heard as if we are inside, but not from the outside without the audio. The final shot here of Kaji in a close-up delivers the punchline about Nerv, which transitions us to the next scene back at Nerv. However, what's really interesting about this final shot is that it breaks the holy 180˚ rule of filmmaking which is, if there is an interaction axis, an invisible line, between two characters like in the second shot between the woman and Kaji, the camera cannot cross to the other side. However, you'll notice that the third shot does exactly that. In order to get the angle that it has, it needs to be looking at Kaji from the other side of the axis. We've crossed the line and broke filmmaking's sacred 180˚ rule. This couldn't be a mistake in execution since the storyboards dictate this breaking of the rule, and they were personally drawn by Anno who knows the 180˚ rule well, as shown by a previous post. What I surmise as the intention of this rule break is that it conveys a sense of doubt in us that these two were interacting in the first place. It asserts that they were merely fellow passengers on the cable car, as if this final shot visually denies, as the two would, that they were talking to each other at all. Also, I've started a Patreon campaign to put more time into AnnoCinema! Check the link in my bio to check out my reward tiers and exciting goals! Editing credit: @watashi_sama

746 likes - 746 comments
From NGE20 we have a scene where Misato drops off Ritsuko to meet Kaji at a love hotel. However, it's not clear that this is what she's up to from the start.

In the prior scene, all Misato says is that she has something to do and can’t have drinks with Ritsuko. Ritsuko's close relationship with Misato allows her to tell the audience what Misato is doing in the final shot, which leads to a scene showing just that.

In terms of shot flow, the unique aspect of this scene is that the usual exposition-story-punchline shot has been tweaked by pushing both the story and punchline to the very last scene. Let's break this down.

Starting us off is a medium close up (MCU) of a traffic signal telling us the location. We’ve seen this done three posts ago with Eva-01 throwing down a prog knife through magma to Eva-02, as well as in another post which starts off with the CU of the SEELE emblem signifying the location. All three of these serve as a mystery shot to hook us into the subsequent reveal shot.

Next is a very wide shot (VWS) which establishes the space and the event of Misato leaving Ritsuko behind. This shot tells us visually what is objectively happening, but it's the next shot that tells us what is emotionally happening with the narrative significance of Misato’s choice.

It's in this third shot that we are revealed to where Misato is going. She's not only leaving Ritsuko behind, she's going to see her man once she knows Shinji is safe, as Ritsuko says.

Ritsuko's explanation is the final line that leads into and sets up the next scene, as we cut to Misato and Kaji in bed.

Editing credit: @watashi_sama

From NGE20 we have a scene where Misato drops off Ritsuko to meet Kaji at a love hotel. However, it's not clear that this is what she's up to from the start. In the prior scene, all Misato says is that she has something to do and can’t have drinks with Ritsuko. Ritsuko's close relationship with Misato allows her to tell the audience what Misato is doing in the final shot, which leads to a scene showing just that. In terms of shot flow, the unique aspect of this scene is that the usual exposition-story-punchline shot has been tweaked by pushing both the story and punchline to the very last scene. Let's break this down. Starting us off is a medium close up (MCU) of a traffic signal telling us the location. We’ve seen this done three posts ago with Eva-01 throwing down a prog knife through magma to Eva-02, as well as in another post which starts off with the CU of the SEELE emblem signifying the location. All three of these serve as a mystery shot to hook us into the subsequent reveal shot. Next is a very wide shot (VWS) which establishes the space and the event of Misato leaving Ritsuko behind. This shot tells us visually what is objectively happening, but it's the next shot that tells us what is emotionally happening with the narrative significance of Misato’s choice. It's in this third shot that we are revealed to where Misato is going. She's not only leaving Ritsuko behind, she's going to see her man once she knows Shinji is safe, as Ritsuko says. Ritsuko's explanation is the final line that leads into and sets up the next scene, as we cut to Misato and Kaji in bed. Editing credit: @watashi_sama

814 likes - 814 comments