Like the green trim on this Nissan GT-R at the local golf club!! Instagram Photos | videos | post

Like the green trim on this Nissan GT-R at the local golf club!!

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The little #MiniMarcos started life as an experimental race car called the DART, an aerodynamically optimized, streamlined #Mini designed by Desmond “Dizzy” Addicott. Modern #Mini fans may never have heard of this car, but it was a wild, race-oriented mini inspired by the teardrop-shaped Fiat and Simca Abarths of the early 60s. The original DART was based on a wrecked Mini panel van that Addicott purchased for £5 and then hacked into #aerodynamic perfection - its teardrop shape was theoretically good for 170mph. In reality, Marcos’ Jem Marsh validated it to 146 mph on the Mulsanne Straight at the ’67 LeMans 24-hr. The DART project never really got off the ground, but spawned four other cars based on the idea - the Mini Jem, the original DART derivative built in north London by Jeremy Delmar-Morgan and later by Robin Statham in Buckinghamshire (1965-76); the Kingfisher Sprint (1980-82); the prettier Midas (1978-today); and the more famous Mini Marcos (pronounced “Marr-koss”). The Mini-Jem was a direct continuation of the DART, but the Mini Marcos was a new car designed to be more practical to make while retaining most of the DART idea and shape. Mini mechanicals were bolted to a #lightweight #fiberglass shell that mimicked the DART’s shape but proved economical to build and sell as a kit car - a good companion to the larger Marcos GT. All the good attributes of the regular #MiniCooper as a competition car were even better in the lightweight Mini Marcos, which debuted as a racer at Castle Combe in 1965, winning its very first event. The highlight of the car’s career was finishing 15th overall at #LeMans in 1966, all on the same BMC A-series mill from the Mini Cooper S. What works as a highly optimized #racing shape may not translate to a pretty car, but they were meant for track days, and it was fast and fun - and cheap. Most Mini Marcos’ were kit cars, and over 1,300 were made over the years, surviving the bankruptcy of Marcos in 1972, the failure of it’s successor builder (D&H fiberglass, which begat the Midas), and ultimately returning to production in 1991 at the revived #Marcos company.

#trackday #specials #renegade_rides #aero #britishcars #kitcar Instagram Photos | videos | post

The little started life as an experimental race car called the DART, an aerodynamically optimized, streamlined designed by Desmond “Dizzy” Addicott. Modern fans may never have heard of this car, but it was a wild, race-oriented mini inspired by the teardrop-shaped Fiat and Simca Abarths of the early 60s. The original DART was based on a wrecked Mini panel van that Addicott purchased for £5 and then hacked into perfection - its teardrop shape was theoretically good for 170mph. In reality, Marcos’ Jem Marsh validated it to 146 mph on the Mulsanne Straight at the ’67 LeMans 24-hr. The DART project never really got off the ground, but spawned four other cars based on the idea - the Mini Jem, the original DART derivative built in north London by Jeremy Delmar-Morgan and later by Robin Statham in Buckinghamshire (1965-76); the Kingfisher Sprint (1980-82); the prettier Midas (1978-today); and the more famous Mini Marcos (pronounced “Marr-koss”). The Mini-Jem was a direct continuation of the DART, but the Mini Marcos was a new car designed to be more practical to make while retaining most of the DART idea and shape. Mini mechanicals were bolted to a shell that mimicked the DART’s shape but proved economical to build and sell as a kit car - a good companion to the larger Marcos GT. All the good attributes of the regular as a competition car were even better in the lightweight Mini Marcos, which debuted as a racer at Castle Combe in 1965, winning its very first event. The highlight of the car’s career was finishing 15th overall at in 1966, all on the same BMC A-series mill from the Mini Cooper S. What works as a highly optimized shape may not translate to a pretty car, but they were meant for track days, and it was fast and fun - and cheap. Most Mini Marcos’ were kit cars, and over 1,300 were made over the years, surviving the bankruptcy of Marcos in 1972, the failure of it’s successor builder (D&H fiberglass, which begat the Midas), and ultimately returning to production in 1991 at the revived company.

306 likes - 4 comments
Like the green trim on this Nissan GT-R at the local golf club!! Instagram Photos | videos | post

Like the green trim on this Nissan GT-R at the local golf club!!

121 likes - 1 comments
The little #MiniMarcos started life as an experimental race car called the DART, an aerodynamically optimized, streamlined #Mini designed by Desmond “Dizzy” Addicott. Modern #Mini fans may never have heard of this car, but it was a wild, race-oriented mini inspired by the teardrop-shaped Fiat and Simca Abarths of the early 60s. The original DART was based on a wrecked Mini panel van that Addicott purchased for £5 and then hacked into #aerodynamic perfection - its teardrop shape was theoretically good for 170mph. In reality, Marcos’ Jem Marsh validated it to 146 mph on the Mulsanne Straight at the ’67 LeMans 24-hr. The DART project never really got off the ground, but spawned four other cars based on the idea - the Mini Jem, the original DART derivative built in north London by Jeremy Delmar-Morgan and later by Robin Statham in Buckinghamshire (1965-76); the Kingfisher Sprint (1980-82); the prettier Midas (1978-today); and the more famous Mini Marcos (pronounced “Marr-koss”). The Mini-Jem was a direct continuation of the DART, but the Mini Marcos was a new car designed to be more practical to make while retaining most of the DART idea and shape. Mini mechanicals were bolted to a #lightweight #fiberglass shell that mimicked the DART’s shape but proved economical to build and sell as a kit car - a good companion to the larger Marcos GT. All the good attributes of the regular #MiniCooper as a competition car were even better in the lightweight Mini Marcos, which debuted as a racer at Castle Combe in 1965, winning its very first event. The highlight of the car’s career was finishing 15th overall at #LeMans in 1966, all on the same BMC A-series mill from the Mini Cooper S. What works as a highly optimized #racing shape may not translate to a pretty car, but they were meant for track days, and it was fast and fun - and cheap. Most Mini Marcos’ were kit cars, and over 1,300 were made over the years, surviving the bankruptcy of Marcos in 1972, the failure of it’s successor builder (D&H fiberglass, which begat the Midas), and ultimately returning to production in 1991 at the revived #Marcos company.

#trackday #specials #renegade_rides #aero #britishcars #kitcar Instagram Photos | videos | post

The little started life as an experimental race car called the DART, an aerodynamically optimized, streamlined designed by Desmond “Dizzy” Addicott. Modern fans may never have heard of this car, but it was a wild, race-oriented mini inspired by the teardrop-shaped Fiat and Simca Abarths of the early 60s. The original DART was based on a wrecked Mini panel van that Addicott purchased for £5 and then hacked into perfection - its teardrop shape was theoretically good for 170mph. In reality, Marcos’ Jem Marsh validated it to 146 mph on the Mulsanne Straight at the ’67 LeMans 24-hr. The DART project never really got off the ground, but spawned four other cars based on the idea - the Mini Jem, the original DART derivative built in north London by Jeremy Delmar-Morgan and later by Robin Statham in Buckinghamshire (1965-76); the Kingfisher Sprint (1980-82); the prettier Midas (1978-today); and the more famous Mini Marcos (pronounced “Marr-koss”). The Mini-Jem was a direct continuation of the DART, but the Mini Marcos was a new car designed to be more practical to make while retaining most of the DART idea and shape. Mini mechanicals were bolted to a shell that mimicked the DART’s shape but proved economical to build and sell as a kit car - a good companion to the larger Marcos GT. All the good attributes of the regular as a competition car were even better in the lightweight Mini Marcos, which debuted as a racer at Castle Combe in 1965, winning its very first event. The highlight of the car’s career was finishing 15th overall at in 1966, all on the same BMC A-series mill from the Mini Cooper S. What works as a highly optimized shape may not translate to a pretty car, but they were meant for track days, and it was fast and fun - and cheap. Most Mini Marcos’ were kit cars, and over 1,300 were made over the years, surviving the bankruptcy of Marcos in 1972, the failure of it’s successor builder (D&H fiberglass, which begat the Midas), and ultimately returning to production in 1991 at the revived company.

306 likes - 4 comments